Posts By yuki

FROM HIROSHIMA TO FUKUSHIMA: ART & POETRY

SUNDAY JUL 20, 2014 | 5-7 PM


leah stenson

In conjunction with Yukiyo Kawano’s current art installation at the Café, Glyph hosts an evening of music, poetry readings and artists’ talks on the intertwined topics of Hiroshima, Fukushima and Hanford.

Poet and editor Leah Stenson reads from her newest book,Reverberations from Fukushima: 50 Japanese Poets Speak Out.

Glyph Cafe

GLYPH CAFÉ AND ARTS SPACE

804 NW COUCH ST. 
PORTLAND, ORE. 97209 
(503) 719-5481

YUKIYO KAWANO “NARROW ROAD TO THE DEEP NORTH”

June 1 – August 1, 2014

glyph 2

Yukiyo Kawano’s hand-dyed silk and paper installation is a study after Bashō’s prosimetric work, Oku no Hosomichi (Narrow Road to the Deep North). Considered to be one of the major texts of classical Japanese literature, Bashō’s work is based on a journey he made in the late spring of 1689 during which he passed through modern-day Fukushima. Kawano’s delicate piece revisits and personalizes the legacy of the nuclear era and the 2011 Daiichi nuclear plant disaster in Fukushima.

Show in Seattle Central Community College

Featured in The Stranger, Seattle’s Newspaper:

SCCC

Currently Hanging: Yukiyo Kawano’s Beautiful Bombs

posted by  on WED, MAY 7, 2014 at 12:12 PM

 http://slog.thestranger.com/slog/archives/2014/05/07/19468530-currently-hanging-yukiyo-kawanos-beautiful-bombs

The show ended May 8th 2014

Black Rain performance 2012

Black Rain 2012

 

During the graduation show at Vermont College of Fine Arts on August 1st, 2012, 10 min performance was held in a hanging object which is based on an image of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant after the blast, that brings fear of the man-made disasters into our visual psyche. The performance dealt with artist’s/women’s desperation about the urgency of expressing our fears about the devastation of our bodies. The historical conjuncture, with the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan and the legacy of the nuclear era, opened up a space for the performativity of one’s questioning of history, memory, witnessing, and disaster in the present moment.

FatMan morning ritual

Journal piece (the making of Fat Man (folded))

 

 

 

sumi ink, ink pen, hemp washi paper, cotton paper (125” x 11”) An accordion-style book/journal shows the process of constructing Fat Man (folded).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail of the journal: a top thin layer shows some of the six months’ (translated) correspondence with hibakusha (Hiroshima victims), while showing the journal beneath appearing through its translucent body.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail of the journal: the journal beneath shows the thinking process of an artist.

FatMan (folded) 2012

 

 

 

kimono, foam, wood, hair, ink, baisen mordant dye
5′ x 5′ x 10′ (height)
The actual size of Fat Man, A-bomb, dropped on Nagasaki in 1945. The piece hangs from the ceiling using single braided wire. The height of the object is adjustable by pulling/loosening the other end of the wire that goes over the top of a pulley which is nailed on the 20’ high beam.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During the show, the object was raised (odd-number days) or lowered (even-number days) following a short ceremonial/ritual performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sketch piece (the making of Little Boy (folded))

 

 

 

watercolor, gouache, ink pen on 100% cotton paper
18” x 24”
some of 35 sketches/mind maps used during a construction of Little Boy (folded). All the 35 sketches contain an image of a figure (self image) wearing the kimono that was used to construct Little Boy (folded).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Little Boy (folded) 2011

 

 

 

kimono, bamboo, ash, hair, ink, baisen mordant dye
24.5″ x 24.5″ x 8′ 11″
A construction/fiber sculpture forms the shape of Little Boy, A-bomb dropped on Hiroshima on Aug. 6th, 1945. All the pieces are sewn with hair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This close up view of Little Boy (folded) shows hair stitched into the silk fabric.